Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Ghosting The Nightingale

Falsetto ghosting
the nightingale.
I'm a mockingbird.
My song's for sale.
Fledge feather flesh,
a borrowed tale;
a layman's lament
for a worm.

For The Tuesday Platform at Real Toads

17 comments:

Timoteo said...

Ooh...it's wiggly!

Buddah Moskowitz said...

I'm a mockingbird too - what we do for worms.

Kerry O'Connor said...

23 words and ever one has weight. You convey so much meaning in a most minimalist way, which has me scratching my head and wondering if I could ever get it right.

X said...

Fledge feather flesh makes for an interesting line. To grow feathers large enough for flight + flesh. I also find the use of for sale and borrowed so close together quite interesting, as is the mourning by the layman of the worm. A bird's gotta eat, you know.

brudberg said...

To be the mockingbird... isn't that what we always do, trying to sell a piece of ourselves?

Sioux said...

"... a layman's lament for a worm" is one of the several well-crafted lines in this poem. (No creepiness today. ;)

Sherry Blue Sky said...

Wow, I have definitely fallen into the deep end of the poetry pool this afternoon. LOL. This is an amazing poem, MZ!

Kim Nelson said...

Brevity. Bravo! And a prompt to take me to my window in the early morning to espy the real owner of that song.

blueoran said...

Joyce named his first (or was it second?) book of poems "Pomepennyeach," after the desperately poor Irish poet of some even poorer century who couldn't get a penny for a poem. I once won 500 bucks in a poetry competition. Long long time ago. But the poverty of this keeps it clean, don't you think? The ends are simple though the means are ocean. Bravo.

Marian said...

What we wouldn't do for that worm, hard to think about.

Gillena Cox said...

Does the worm make it a morning poem, like "catches the fattest worms"

Much love.
..

Fireblossom said...

The early worm gets eaten by the bird, I always say. Silliness aside, and at the risk of being a dittohead, your economy of words while saying plenty is impressive as hell.

Sharon Wagner said...

I don't know about worms, but I'm reading to Kill a Mocking bird right now.

C.C. said...

Your phrasing in this is particularly captivating.

Outlawyer said...

Hi MZ--we are all worm's meat in the end, I guess. This is so lyrical and thoughtful and succinct. You are very brave to be so discriminating in your word choices--it is terrific. An inspiration. Thanks, much. k.

Susie Clevenger said...

"a layman's lament for a worm." I love that.

save one said...
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