Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Last Weekend At The Lake

She swam like a fish.
Called her brother "little turd face" every time they spoke.
Danced to Katy Perry up and down the beach.

Her parents request that everyone wear purple or pink
and bring bubbles.

She was eight,
and she swam like a fish.

Note: Inspired by an actual obituary.  I bawled like a baby.

For Words Count at Real Toads

25 comments:

Susan said...

O. This poem, memorial touching life, turned on my faucets too.

grapeling said...

dammit. times like this, words are never enough.

Lolamouse said...

I was smiling until the end. Yeesh! This one punched me in the gut.

Hannah said...

Oh my God. Mama, sweet Mama Zen...this is so heartbreaking. Thank you for writing this for her. ♥

hedgewitch said...

Rare to see the joy of life remembered at death--how we all might want to be remembered, I think. Eloquent and tragic.

Marian said...

oh good lord. wah.

Sylvia K said...

Heartbreaking and beautiful indeed, MZ! Thank you!

Sam Edge said...

Wow what a footnote MZ.

chamomile sea said...

I love it when you do that --- use words in the title or opening that mean one thing, but by the end you've completely turned the phrase on its head. This is my favorite part: "Her parents request that everyone wear purple or pink and bring bubbles." So frightening how we can go into our days expecting certain things, only to be met with unbearable tragedy. How perfect the way you worked in her final words, "turd face." We never know which of our words may be our last, which memories will be left to linger.

Kerry O'Connor said...

This poem is so filled with life and hope - so sad to know it was the girl's last birthday.

Margaret said...

I know you by now. It started out in past tense.

Her family has class.

Kay L. Davies said...

Obituary for an eight-year-old. Dreadful thought. But if everyone wears pink and purple...no, everyone will still cry. How not?
K

Debi Swim said...

I can't imagine - I don't want to imagine...
This was just so touching. Fine job!

Susie Clevenger said...

Oh my, the tears. You managed such a fitting and lovely tribute.

Buddah Moskowitz said...

Very touching - so many little details in such a little time on Earth.

Fireblossom said...

Not hard to understand why such a thing would get to you, MZ. Far too close to home.

"Little Turdface". That's a kid classic.

Helen said...

Such a bittersweet poem ... :-(

Sherry Blue Sky said...

OMG, this is a heartbreaker. I know a rock-star thirteen year old who is battling bone cancer right now, so bravely. It is all way too horrible and unfair, to lose children. I love it that all were asked to wear pink and purple and bring bubbles. I cant imagine getting thru that ceremony.

Mary said...

What sadness some people have to endure.

Gail said...

Gut-wrenching. Well done.

Lorraine said...

I can't imagine something more painful but you do her honour by your poem...

Sioux said...

MZ--This had a ring of truth before I even saw your note at the end...

It IS so tragic when babies this young die...

Sharp Little Pencil said...

Mama, I was dancing along with that little girl, laughing at "turd face," and then it hit me with the parents' request and I knew.

Oh, how this hit the nail on the head, how heartbreaking, and how real. You brought it home, and prayers out to the parents, who had real guts writing that obit. Amy

De said...

Oh holy cow. Man. My heart.
This was so powerful.

Outlawyer said...

Agh. This is too sad. It's difficult to comprehend how people live with such losses--of course, they are not truly given much of a choice when such things happen, and they have another child. You've captured it all so well. On the poem level, i'm wondering if you'd want to clarify something in the title--or last lines--I don't know the poem is so good, and does softly give away the loss--but it's hard to tell since there is your note, which, of course, hits with a hammer. You use the changes of tense very well, but since the title is also in the past tense, it is a little unclear. (Maybe I'm thinking only of dense readers.) I don't mean to approach it this way - it's so sad, and it's a wonderful poem, as is. I hope you don't mind. k.