Sunday, October 28, 2012

Ghosting The Writer

Let me linger
here
at birth's bedside -

hands hovering at your brow,
but not daring
to smooth the furrows,

ear turned and tilted
to catch any wayward,
whispered word.

Let me linger
here with you
at birth's bedside

as midwife,
as muse,
or as mere

secondhand god.

15 comments:

Laurie Kolp said...

This is enigmatic... I'm glad you repeated this:

Let me linger
here with you
at birth's bedside

Far Beyond The Ridge said...

What a lovely haunting, MZ
Didn't know there were second hand gods, but i think maybe a god that's been around the block and pawned off could be a good thing.
But beware the wayward whispered word, i think.
Gorgeous as always, mama

Brian Miller said...

second hand god....the one that cares for a child becomes as such to them, for sure...and forbid anything happen to our gods...

Fireblossom said...

Interesting comments.

Heaven said...

I like the last 4 lines...intriguing take MZ ~

hedgewitch said...

"..as mere' really caught me, thinking of a reflective body of water--then you topped it with second hand god. Strong work with the metaphor.

kaykuala said...

hands hovering at your brow,
but not daring
to smooth the furrows,

It gives an impression of some poignant moments. Very effective, MZ!

Hank

Fred Rutherford said...

cool write MZ. Secondhand God, Hovering at your brow, to catch any wayward, whispered word, at births bedside--very cool lines.

Michael said...

a mothers love... we love them back like none other.

Mary said...

I just love the ending of this poem, Kelli! Beautifully expressed.

Margaret said...

... Lovely.

PattiKen said...

Nice. The tilted ear makes me wonder if you've served as midwife to a pooch.

Fireblossom said...

I wanted to come back and tell you how this beautiful poem has stayed with me since i read it.

Shawna said...

At the end, my brain turns "mere" into "cashmere."

I love your subtle change from "here" to "here with you." Stanzas 2 and 3 are my favorites. Another perfect metaphor---"midwife" assisting a writer in giving birth, but wary of standing too close. However, you can't get much closer to a person than helping her deliver her baby. :)

Shawna said...

I just read your comments about "secondhand god." I think what you mean is that delivering a baby (or a piece of written work) is much like doing the work of God in that you are part of creation and giving life in a way. You're not actually God, but you feel like a sort of secondhand version. Also, you might see the writer as a god and yourself as a secondhand god, like maybe you are in awe of another's writing. Plus, "secondhand" implies feeling worn out or not at best performance. But even in such a state, you still feel like a god and that must be pretty amazing. :) Perhaps just exhausted from the creation process. It's tiring to be a muse too, I'm sure.